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Researchers find North Atlantic great whites spend their first 20 years in the waters off Montauk, Long Island.

After several decades of decline, great white sharks in the North Atlantic are finally on the rise. That’s great news for ecosystem health, even if it freaks out beach goers. But scientists still know little about the migratory patterns of young sharks, which is a challenge for conservationists.

Now, a group of researchers think they’ve located a shark “nursery”—the first found in the North Atlantic.

This unprecedented kill reveals why we need to keep rivers resilient.

It was the kind of clear late-August day that anglers live for. Yet at the Yellowstone River near Livingston, Montana, not a single oar boat or even a fishing line broke the river’s calm surface. All was still, save for an osprey scavenging the corpses of pale, shimmering whitefish along the gravelly shoreline. A light breeze carried the sweetish smell of aquatic decay.

Earlier this month, the Yellowstone River made national headlines with the news of an unprecedented fish die-off in its usually healthy waters. Starting in mid-August, biologists counted 4,000 dead whitefish floating on the Yellowstone or washed ashore, but they estimate that the true number is in the tens of thousands. As if that wasn’t enough, they’ve recently spotted rainbow trout and Yellowstone cutthroat trout—both economically important species—go belly-up as well.

Australian researchers have investigated signs of geological structures hidden behind the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland, and have found a much deeper reef spanning more than 6,000 square kilometres (2,316 square miles).

New seafloor maps of the area have revealed a vast, underwater field of doughnut-shaped mounds, each one measuring 200 to 300 metres (656 to 984 feet) across, and some as much as 30 metres deep.

Eerie Video Shows How Coral Bleaches

Wednesday, 17 August 2016

Time-lapse video captures the coral's convulsions while it expels the algae that give it color.

Coral itself is not colorful. It gets it's hues from a special types of algae, called zooxanthellae, that lives in its tissues, feeding on the coral’s metabolic waste. In return, the algae produces sugars and amino acids that the coral polyp eats as food.

When coral gets stressed from events like a rise in water temperatures, it ejects its colorful algal companions, turning white in a process called bleaching. But how this happens is not well understood. So to figure it out, a team of researchers from Queensland University of Technology caught this process in action using time-lapse video.

New radiocarbon dating of eye lenses suggests life span up to 392 years.

The latest in birthday science proposes that the vertebrate with the longest life span yet measured is the mysterious Greenland shark.

Dating based on forms of carbon found in sharks’ eye lenses suggests that a large female Somniosus microcephalus was about 392 years old (give or take 120 years) when she died, says marine biologist Julius Nielsen of University of Copenhagen.

The ocean floor teems with mineral treasures, but extracting them could jeopardize an unexplored alien world.

People have been clawing valuable minerals like iron and gold out of the ground for millennia. And for much of the stuff that touches our lives today—from the europium, terbium and yttrium that help illuminate the screen you are reading to the copper in the wires that power it—we increasingly depend on elements from the depths of the Earth.

But finding new deposits gets harder every year and mines are steadily growing larger, more expensive and more environmentally destructive. On land, that is.

One of the most rapidly warming places on Earth in the past half century actually cooled in the past 20 years, according to research that may be seized on by those who have doubts about global warming.

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